Emergency Information

Emergency? What to do:

Fires

Severe Weather 

Severe Weather Watch - means severe weather is possibly approaching. 

Severe Weather Warning - means approaching severe weather is an immediate threat.

Flooding 

Flooding can occur due to major rainstorms, water main breaks, or damage to local area dams. In the event of imminent or actual flooding:

  • Secure and/or shut off vital equipment, records, and hazardous materials.
  • Move all personnel to a safe area and contact Campus Security x2815.
  • If advised to, do not delay in moving to higher ground.
  • Check with authorities before using/drinking water from public utility systems.
  • More information: http://www.redcross.org/prepare/disaster/flood or http://www.ready.gov/floods

Power Outages/Blackouts

  • Do not panic; provide assistance to others.
  • Turn off and unplug computers and other sensitive electronic equipment.
  • Move to a lighted area. Exits may be indicated by a lighted exit sign, if the emergency power is operating.
  • More information: http://www.redcross.org/prepare/disaster/power-outage

Chemical Spills 

  • Vacate the building immediately by pulling the fire alarm.
  • Once away from the spill, call 911.
  • Notify Physical Plant x2247, to shut down the ventilation and HVAC systems.
  • If physical contact occurs with the spilled chemical, immediately remove all contaminated clothing and flush contact areas with large amounts of water for at least 15 minutes.
  • More information: http://www.redcross.org/prepare/disaster/chemical-emergency

Earthquake 

  • Stay where you are, get under a desk or table or stand in a doorway.
  • If outside, get into an open area away from buildings, power lines, and trees.
  • If driving, pull over and stop. Avoid overpasses and power lines. Remain inside the vehicle.
  • Call 911 and provide first aid to any injured personnel.
  • More information: http://www.fema.gov/hazard/earthquake/index.shtm

In the event of an emergency, how do I contact my family?

Disruption of communication systems will usually occur to some degree in any emergency situation. Many people who have a wireless telephone in their home that functions with a base station and requires electricity to operate, will experience failure. These base station phones will not work in a power outage. Cell phones are a great alternative, but cell phone systems may be unavailable due to overuse or may only function for a short time if electrical power is out. If phone lines are functional, it may be easier to call long-distance than it is to call locally. The loss of contact with family and friends during an emergency can happen very easily. Planning for emergency communications is very important. Regularly update all of your numbers as part of the plan. For assistance in implementing or developing a family and friends emergency communications plan please visit this website: http://www.ready.gov/make-a-plan

 Emergency Quick Reference Guide