Agenda

Check-in & Welcome (Williams Conference Center)

8:30 - 9:00:  Breakfast & Salutations

9:00 - 9:20:  Welcome & Announcements

Break-out Sessions (Various Locations)

9:30 - 10:30: DISCIPLINE SESSIONS A

Discipline:  Art (ART)
Division:  Humanities
Facilitator(s):  Ray Esparsen, Professor of Art
Location:  Art Studio 
The Moral Imperatives of Right and Wrong As The Most Important Quality That Determines Great ART
Some state that we have no way of knowing what qualities determine great art.  Others say that great art is self-evident, hence no need for analysis and judgments about quality.  And finally some say that great art is created by artists that refuse to be part of the status quo.  We may well agree with the above analysis but some distance from the idea of a moral imperative might be warranted.  Participants will discuss and collaborate on what constitutes "great art."

Discipline:  Business (BUS), Economics (ECON)
Division:  Business
Facilitator(s):  Billy Lemus, Assistant Professor; Dr. Sue Hasbrouck, Assistant Professor; Brett Morris, Instructor
Location:  TJH 108
Simulation Education
Join Business Division faculty as they present a two-part presentation.  Part one will overview innovative techniques for economics education including simulations and competitions.  In part two, participants will discuss simulations and games in business education.

Discipline:  English (ENGL 101, 102, 175), Communication Arts (COMM)
Division:  Humanities
Facilitator(s):  Chris Wadley, Dual Credit English Teacher
Location:  SAC 146  
Quick and Easy Interactive Technology
Participants will explore ideas for using interactive technology that require minimal set-up, as students analyze literary characters and concepts using poetry, icons, symbols, and direct textual evidence. We will look at examples of student generated work using various interactive strategies.  We will experience a “hands on” mini-lesson using a story familiar to all teachers, then discuss and share ways to adapt the activities to our own curricula and/or content.  Bringing a laptop or tablet that connects to the Internet, Google Classroom, and Google Slides will be very helpful for this session.

Discipline:  Sciences (BIOL, CS, CHEM, FSCI, GEOL, NS, PHYS)
Division:  Natural Sciences & Mathematics
Facilitator(s):   Dr. Nancy Johnston, Associate Professor of Chemistry; Dr. Wendy Shuttleworth, Professor of Biology; Dr. Alex Bezzerides, Associate Professor of Biology; Dr. Lloyd Mataka, Assistant Professor of Chemistry
Location:  SGC 229  
Case Study Workshop—Appeal to Multiple Scientific Subjects
Scientific topics within biology, chemistry, and earth science will be explored using the case study method.  This approach allows students to learn concepts and apply them to real life scenarios, use critical thinking skills, and make interdisciplinary connections.  The workshop will demonstrate how to use case studies in a variety of dual credit classes.

Discipline:  All (General Session)
Division:  All
Facilitator(s):  Dr. Amanda Van Lanen, Associate Professor of History
Location:  SGC 119
Building a Sense of Belonging in the Classroom
This workshop will focus on ways to build academic and social belonging in the classroom. Quality relationships between students, their peers, and faculty have been shown to increase student success. Students are more successful when they feel that they belong, have something to learn, and have something to contribute.  In this collaborative workshop you will learn what LCSC is doing to improve belonging and share your ideas for creating belonging in your classrooms.

10:45 - 11:45: DISCIPLINE SESSIONS B

Discipline:  Mathematics (MATH, MTHPT)
Division:  Natural Sciences & Mathematics, Business Technology & Service
Facilitator(s):  Becky Snider, Assistant Professor of Mathematics; Darbie Duclos, Dual Credit Math Teacher
Location:  SGC 229  
Share N’Tell
Add to your bucket of great activities to get your students applying the mathematical concepts.  Dual Credit and LCSC instructors will be sharing ideas to enhance your classroom.

Discipline:  Political Science (POLS), History (HIST)
Division:  Social Sciences
Facilitator(s):  Dr. Leif Hoffmann, Associate Professor of Political Science; John Kowatsch, Dual Credit Political Science and English Teacher
Location:  TJH 108
College-Level Work: Lessons learned and remaining challenges from teaching dual credit students
This workshop focuses on a general question and answer session of our respective experiences as dual credit teachers and liaisons. The facilitators will start out the discussion by sharing their thoughts and experiences of jointly serving and educating dual credit students, especially in the field of political science. They will talk about what has worked so far for them, what the respective needs and concerns of the different parties are, and what remain the overarching challenges for students, teachers and liaisons. Dual credit teachers are encouraged to participate actively in sharing their own reflections on what has worked in their relationships with students, liaisons and administrators. The goal is to reflect on ideas on how we could improve the interaction between dual credit teachers and liaisons, the overarching dual credit structure and requirements as well as student learning and the provision of excellent academic content.

Discipline:  Psychology (PSYC)
Division:  Social Sciences
Facilitator(s):  Dr. Rachelle Genthos, Assistant Professor of Social Psychology
Location:  ACW 135  
Using the Reproducibility Project to Emphasize the Scientific Method and Ethics in Introduction to Psychology Courses
Psychological sciences face obstacles that other areas of science do not: the most typical unit of analysis, human beings, are complex, dynamic, intuitive organisms that also react to being studied. Indeed, psychological findings are almost always embedded within a strange social situation (e.g. experiment). If psychological researchers do not carefully follow the scientific method, the very biases covered throughout Introduction to Psychology courses can keep them from obtaining a certain degree of objectivity and maintaining scientific integrity. Over the last decade, psychological science has been scrutinized due to egregious cases of fraud (e.g. Marc Hauser, Diedrik Stapel) and limited success in replicated findings (see the Reproducibility Project, Nosek, 2011), that have not yet been integrated into most textbooks. The workshop will address how these occurrences have led to shift in the scientific procedures, ethical practices, and emphasis on replication not only in psychology, but across the sciences. After a brief demonstration lecture, ideas for how to integrate these historical events into Ch. 1 Thinking Critically with Psychological Science course content (e.g. hindsight bias, apophenia, replication, double-blind procedure) and activities (e.g. ethical dilemma prompts) will be discussed.

Discipline:  Spanish (SPAN)
Division:  Humanities
Facilitator(s):  Julie Bezzerides, Associate Professor of Spanish
Location:  SAC 146 
Activity Refresh: Engaging and Motivating the Second Language Learner (SLL) through Interactive Classroom Games
Do you feel as though you could use a new interactive activity for your second language classroom? Session participants will each share a favorite, interactive classroom activity or game. Please bring a short lesson plan and/or materials to describe and demonstrate your chosen activity or game. Participants will leave the session with a collection of five new ideas for how to engage and motivate their students in the process of second-language acquisition. The session will also address our 2019-2020 assessment responsibilities pertaining to General Education course outcomes (SPAN 101, 102, and 201) and Humanistic Ways of Knowing course outcomes (SPAN 101 and 102).

Discipline:  All (General Session)
Division:  All
Facilitator(s):  Dr. Amanda Van Lanen, Associate Professor of History
Location:  SGC 119
Building a Sense of Belonging in the Classroom
This workshop will focus on ways to build academic and social belonging in the classroom. Quality relationships between students, their peers, and faculty have been shown to increase student success. Students are more successful when they feel that they belong, have something to learn, and have something to contribute.  In this collaborative workshop you will learn what LCSC is doing to improve belonging and share your ideas for creating belonging in your classrooms.

Lunch (Williams Conference Center)

12:00 - 1:00:  Lunch with LCSC Faculty and Staff

LCSC Q & A

1:00 – 2:00:  How can we help? An optional opportunity to learn more.